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3 Ways to be Smart about Business Expenses as a New Business Owner

New business owners become overwhelmed by expenses, taxes, and financial issues in a short time. With so much to do and manage, it is challenging to keep tabs on expenses. But, if you want to stay in business, you must keep your spending in check, stay on top of your tax responsibilities, and prioritize tasks and expenses. Our tips will show you how to do it all.

  1. Hire a Financial Advisor Specializing in Small Businesses

It seems strange to emphasize keeping expenses in check and then suggest hiring a financial advisor, but it is the best way for you to comply with tax laws, make smart purchases and investments, and protect your assets as your business grows. Your best move is to choose a financial advisor who has ample experience in assisting small businesses and who understands the ever-changing tax laws.

If you work from home, you especially need a financial advisor to help you determine whether claiming your home office is the best way to proceed with your taxes. It also is more challenging for small business owners who work from home to keep their personal and business expenses separate, and a financial advisor will ensure you do things by the book to avoid penalties or fees. Your financial advisor also will help you find areas to save costs and prevent you from using too much of your personal money to grow your business.

  1. Create a Budget… and Stick to It

Your financial advisor also will help you create a budget for your small business or your home office. It is critical that you stick to your budget because you don’t want to stretch your new business too thin in the early stages.

In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that about 80% of businesses with employees survive their first year in business, 66% survive their second year, and about 50% will survive their fifth year. However, only about 30% survive their tenth year. Why do so many small businesses fail? For many of them, the answer is lack of sufficient capital and cash flow problems. One study shows that 82% of businesses fail due to cashflow problems.

The lessons new business owners must learn are that they need to manage their expenses wisely, and they need to have enough capital to grow. The solution to these common issues is to prioritize your needs by creating and sticking to a budget.

If working from home is the best way to start your business, do so to save overhead costs. You’d be surprised by how much you can accomplish with the perfect workspace in your home and the right technology. You’ll likely be able to get off the ground with reliable, high-speed internet, a laptop or tablet, and a reliable printer and phone. There are even online payment systems that allow remote business owners to receive one-time or recurringclient payments from the comforts of a home office. Reliability and convenience are much more important than spending too much for the latest technology, phones, or gadgets.

  1. Make Priorities

As a new business owner, the bulk of the work will fall to you. Because your time is money when you’re in charge, you need to be as productive as possible and make time for yourself and your family. That may be easier said than done if you work from home, so set your hours based on when you are most productive and make time for your family to strike a work-life balance. The perk of working from home is setting your schedule, so do so wisely.

You’ll also need to prioritize your workday tasks. While answering emails is an important part of your role as a new business owner, other tasks will suffer if you spend too much time checking your inbox and replying to emails that are not urgent.

To spend less time on email, set up an automatic response and take advantage of canned responses. You’ll still respond to customers promptly, but you’ll also be more productive if you schedule time for email throughout your day. It’s also important to prioritize record keeping for tax purposes and to create a system for filing receipts and other documents that will support your business expense claims each quarter.

New business owners succeed when they make smart decisions about expenses. Make it easier on yourself by hiring a financial advisor specializing in small business, creating and sticking to a budget, and making priorities.

Guest post: About the Author

Ms. Fisher has spent more than 20 years as a CPA, and is currently working on a book about financial literacy (due out in 2018). She also runs Financiallywell.info.

Reasons You Should Have a Business Credit Card

If you are self-employed or the owner of a business, you should seriously consider getting a business credit card and use it exclusively for your business-related purchases. Picking the right card can save you time and money – let’s see why.

Taxes:

Your business expenses are tax-deductible. The easiest way to keep track of these expenses is to charge them to your business credit card whenever feasible. Furthermore, you can deduct interest charges and/or annual fees on your card, as long as you use it exclusively for business. Those fees aren’t deductible on a personal credit card, even if you charge some business expenses on it. At tax time, you can look at your business credit card transactions for the tax year for a quick summary of your deductions, which will save you time (and money if you use a tax preparer). By the way, the IRS frowns on intermixing personal and business spending, and you might attract unwanted attention if you mix your spending on the same card. It might also help to show the IRS your business is a business, not a hobby.

Credit history:

Using a business credit card for your LLC or corporation will create a credit history for the business. That’s very important, especially if you pay your bills on time. Having a good credit history should result in a good credit score for your business and easier access to business loans.

Bonus points:

Most self-respecting credit cards, whether personal or business, reward you with bonus points or cash back on your purchases. The problem with personal cards is that they might not reward you for the kind of expenses your business incurs. For example, a personal card might reward grocery store purchases but not social media advertising. It’s smart to get a business credit card that offers rewards on purchases like search engine advertising, internet services, business travel, shipping costs and so forth. Some of these purchases might not earn you any rewards on your personal card. You might be able to pool your points from your business and personal credit cards if they come from the same issuer.

Bookkeeping:

If you make all your purchases on a personal credit card, you’ll have to waste time every month separating the business purchases from the non-business ones. Yes, you can still deduct business expenses charged on a personal card, but why do the extra work and risk overlooking several expenses? You can export your business card transactions directly into accounting programs like QuickBooks and save a lot of time. Business credit card statements are often more detailed, and this comes in handy if you have employees who get their own copies of your business credit card, which most issuers will provide you for free. By setting up your business card, you can quickly give one to each new hire. Don’t forget, you collect all the rewards on your employees’ purchases when they use your business card.

A business credit card is a no-brainer for sole proprietorships, partnerships, and limited liability companies. There are a few cautions to be aware of when choosing a corporate business credit card:

Fees:

Many personal and small-business credit cards have no annual fees. However, many corporate cards have fees, some of them on the high side. Also, many of these credit cards charge a higher interest rate compared to personal cards.

Grumbling:

Your suppliers and vendors might grumble if you pay them with a corporate credit card, because the transaction fees they have to pay on these cards are much higher.

Abuse:

If you have employees sharing a corporate card, be on the lookout for any personal purchases they make with it. First, they are stealing from you if they do this. Secondly, even if you don’t catch it, the IRS might, especially if you deducted personal expenses as business ones.

How to Tell if It’s Time to See a Financial Advisor for My Business

An American College survey of business owners found that 60 percent of respondents have not met with a financial advisor, and few had developed contingency plans for future events that could affect their businesses. A financial advisor has the expertise and experience to help you maximize the effectiveness of your capital investment in your business, and meeting with one can be quite beneficial.

While it’s a good idea to use a financial advisor from the beginning, you might have put it off. Here are five ways to tell that now is the time to see a business financial advisor:

Cash flow problem:

A financial advisor can help when you suddenly find your business facing an unexpected cash crunch. The advisor will help you work out your options for plugging the cash gap in the short run and preventing it in the future. One alternative is to acquire a working capital loan, such as the ones we provide at IOU Financial. Short-term loans provide the liquidity you need to continue operations, and the cost is quite modest compared to the consequences of not paying your bills on time.

Buildup of owner’s equity:

Good news can also trigger the need for a business advisor. One happy scenario is that your business is doing better than expected and your owner’s equity account is growing must larger than anticipated. You’ll want to speak to an advisor to see how to put that extra cash to work in a tax-friendly way. Sure, you could simply withdraw it, but that will create a personal tax liability. An advisor can help you look at different alternatives to grow your business, such as extending your geographical reach or expanding/enriching your product mix. You might want to hire additional employees or move to a better location – these alternatives require careful planning that a business advisor can provide.

Sudden opportunity:

Sometimes, opportunity knocks and you’re not quite ready. For example, a key competitor might approach you with an offer to let you buy it out. Or a sudden deal becomes available that would let you significantly increase your inventory at a highly-discounted cost. A financial advisor can help you work out how to take advantage of the opportunity in the most efficient way. Once again, a short-term loan might be the answer. IOU Financial can lend you up to $300,000 to grow your business at an affordable cost. Opportunities don’t come along that often. Be prepared to seize them, and to do so in the most efficient manner.

Thinking about retirement:

A business financial advisor should be brought in well before your retirement date to help work out how to sell the business and how to best use the proceeds of the sale. For example, it would be nice to minimize the tax impact of a big payout. A financial advisor can show you alternatives like trusts, charitable contributions and tax-sheltered accounts. It might require you to restructure your company before you sell it in order to reap the best after-tax benefit from its sale.

You’re feeling overwhelmed:

Maybe you know your business more than you understand finance. As your company grows, you might find yourself paralyzed by financial ignorance. Hire a business financial advisor to break the logjam and get you moving in a positive direction. Don’t mismanage your success. Don’t be afraid to get help before your sweet business turns sour.

Money Habits for Business Owners to Employ in the New Year

2018 should be an exciting year for small businesses, with lower taxes and a bubbling economy. This is no time to take your eye off the ball – you must continue to pay attention to your money habits if you want your business to do its best. Here are seven tips to help strengthen your business financials:

Set your financial goals:

You should have short-term objectives and long-term goals that will keep you motivated every day. Your goals should be timely, realistic, measurable, attainable and specific. That means you should have a plan, preferably written-out, on how you’ll achieve your goals. Prioritize these plans and then track your progress against them, using a spreadsheet or word document.

Set annual and monthly budgets:

Include assets, liabilities, income, expenses and equity. Use the IOU Financial Business Budget Smart Sheet as your starting point. Pick out areas where you want to save money, and periods of seasonal challenges that might require an infusion of working capital. We at IOU Financial can help arrange quick financing when you need it, with easy payback terms, so keep us in mind when you lay out your monthly budgets. Track your actuals against your projections and try to keep it real.

Know your cash flows:

You might need to send money out, in the form of payments to employees, contractors, suppliers, taxes, etc., before the money comes in from customers. That’s why you need a daily rundown of cash flows and have sufficient reserves when revenues are late or debts go bad. That’s another reason to establish a relationship with IOU Financial. Lack of liquidity kills businesses, so stay on top of your cash flows and recognize potential early.

Spend to grow:

Managing your money doesn’t mean you have to be a tightwad. You should spend some of your profits to grow and strengthen your company. Send key employees for training, improve your equipment and facilities, hire marketing professionals and attend business events. The up-front costs will more than repay themselves with new opportunities.

Need vs want:

Owners like to dream about all the things they want to do to make the business bigger and better. Never give up on your dreams, but always address your needs first. You might have to sacrifice the ideal for now in order to attain it later. This will reduce your risk of unplanned spending for things you don’t really need now, freeing up capital for later use.

Use debt wisely:

Debt is a tool, to be used wisely when needed and to be paid off when feasible. Look upon the interest you pay as another cost of doing business, one that allows you to meet your obligations and keep the doors open. When you take out a business loan, come to a lender like IOU Financial that will get you the money quickly without a lot of paperwork. We offer a unique daily repayment method so that you never are faced with a mountainous monthly payment, and you can refinance with us after you repay 40 percent. Always insist on affordable rates, no upfront fees and no prepayment penalties – that’s how we operate and so should you.

Protect your income:

Consider disability insurance that will keep the money coming in if something untoward happens to you. Business owners typically don’t get paid sick leave or worker’s comp, so they need a way to protect against the unforeseen. Disability insurance can help you overcome a temporary disability that would otherwise torpedo your business.

Remember, IOU Financial is here to help you when you need money fast. Add us to your speed-dial list for 2018 (1-866-217-8564) and worry a little less about the future.

Tips for Creating Next Year’s Budget

The new year brings opportunities to make your small business more successful. There’s no better place to start than with your annual budget. It encapsulates your revenue and expense expectations in a single spreadsheet. Here are some handy tips for creating your new budget:

Analyze last year’s budget:

How closely did your estimates match actual experience? You probably under- or over-estimated at least some of your cash flows. Learn from your mistakes to set your numbers more realistically, wishful thinking aside. If your data shows a trend throughout the year, incorporate it into the new budget. Some numbers are harder to estimate – if you have a lot of these, try doing a best-, worst- and average-case version of the budget.

Break it up:

You should break down your annual numbers into monthly ones. This gives you the ability to incorporate seasonal differences that more closely match your cash flows. It also lets you apply actuals and revise numbers based on experience.

Budget in a cash cushion:

A good budget will incorporate a cash cushion to help you survive sudden crunches. Near-cash securities such as T-Bills are a fine place to stash the extra cash. Even if it’s an unusual year that doesn’t see unpleasant surprises, extra cash will certainly come in handy sooner or later.

Seek help:

Do you find setting up and working a budget confusing? Don’t fumble through it. There are many resources available to you to assist. We recommend our Business Budget Smart Sheet, which will help you analyze your spending patterns, streamline areas of overspending, gauge the cash flow impact of fixed and variable costs, and much more. If you need more help, speak with your accountant or tax specialist.

Make adjustments:

Are you selling more units each month and losing money on each sale? Bite the bullet and raise your prices (and slash your expenses). Calculate your new revenues based on higher prices and incorporate into your budget. Do the same when you reduce expenses. For example, you might find it cheaper to subcontract out some of the work that you currently do in-house. Your budget should reflect your best ideas for making a profit.

Create recession contingency budget:

At the time of writing, the U.S. is enjoying a growing economy. What would happen to your business if we suddenly fell into a recession? It will happen sooner or later, and you’d best be prepared by creating a recession budget as a contingency. The recession budget is based on conserving cash in the face of lower demand for your product or service.

Remember, budgets are planning tools, not straightjackets. Remain flexible, and you can always turn to IOU Financial if you find yourself short of cash despite your best planning.

 

3 Things you can do NOW to Avoid Tax Headaches Next Year

As the days are winding down at the end of the year, it may be tempting to relax and start planning for time off during the holidays. However, business owners should know by now that there is rarely time to relax when running their business. The end of the year is actually the perfect time to get busy and plan now to avoid tax headaches next year. We recommend three things to consider doing now to ease the burden come next April.

Incorporate Ways to Boost Accounting Efficiency

For most business owners, the most difficult part of doing taxes is preparing for them. Gathering receipts, calculating the cost of doing business and counting your profits takes up a lot of time. Losing or forgetting important documents that represent spending or profits can lead to mistakes on taxes and a big headache for you.

How can you streamline the process of preparing for taxes? By reconsidering how you conduct your administrative services and incorporating new ways to boost efficiency. For example, instead of writing paper checks and balancing your checkbook, switch to sending electronic checks straight from your bank account. Not only will this save you the price of a stamp, but it will also help you track all of your spending via your bank account in one place.

Purchasing an accounting program, such as Quickbooks, is another advantageous strategy that allows you to regularly update all of your financial information, spending and earning, in order to generate reports when filing your taxes. 

Automate Your Payroll System

How do you pay your employees? If you do so manually, you are not only wasting valuable time, but you may make mistakes that can prove to be troublesome for you and your staff. To increase productivity and eliminate errors, invest in an automated payroll system which pays your employees through a computerized system.

A special payroll system will calculate wages based on employee agreements (hourly pay or salary) and generate paychecks as well arranging direct deposits.

The first tax benefit of an automated payroll system is that it is a safe place to store payroll records that doesn’t take up any space. Remember that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) dictates that employment tax records must be kept for at least four years!

The second benefit of this system is that it makes it easy to accurately withhold necessary deductions, such as state income, social security and Medicare taxes. Utilizing the system’s hard-coded tax rates, you eliminate payroll tax errors come tax time.

Finally, the payroll system syncs with your accounting system to provide accurate reports whenever you need them.

Save for Business Taxes

The end of the year is the right time to approximate how much small business taxes you may be liable for. Print or create a profit and loss statement to reflect your financial situation; once you have this information, you can count how much taxes you may be responsible for.

This will help avoid unpleasant surprises come tax time, and will help you save the required amount to pay off the taxes. Remember that the IRS also offers convenient payment plans if you cannot pay the full amount by the due date.

If you need help affording a payroll and/ or accounting system or require financial assistance to pay off your business taxes, turn to IOU Financial. Our hassle-free small business loans of up to $300,000 can be in your bank account in under 48 hours! Contact us today!

3 Ways to Strengthen Your Business Credit Score

Similar to a high FICO score, it is important to have a strong business credit score. In order to qualify for loans or get approved for trade credit, you must prove that your company is a safe bet for investors, banks and private lenders.

A low business credit score signifies that your business carries a significant amount of risk to lend funds to, which will result in either a denial of a loan or unfavorable rates and terms based on the level of risk. Additionally, you can qualify for lower insurance rates with a higher credit score.

How is Your Business Credit Score Calculated?

Your business score is calculated by credit-reporting agencies that utilize an algorithm based on various factors. Although your score can fluctuate slightly depending on the agency and its scoring model, similar factors are taken into account when determining your score.

Your business’ creditworthiness is rated on a scale from 0 to 100 based on the accounts in your company’s name. It is important to note, however, that business lenders may consider your personal FICO scores in their decision-making process.

How to Strengthen Your Business Credit Score

In order to improve your business’ creditworthiness, you must strengthen your business credit score. There are three effective ways to do so, which include:

Monitor Your Credit Report

The first and most effective way of strengthening your credit score is regularly monitoring your credit report. No system is created perfectly, and errors are common between lenders and credit reporting agencies.

If you don’t monitor your credit report, you will not be aware of discrepancies that can significantly plummet your business credit score. Get in the habit of requesting annual credit reports from the three credit reporting agencies, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax, which will alert you to issues that you must address to improve your score.

Pay Bills on Time

It is no easy task to manage your personal and business expenses, which is why you may not have enough funds every month to pay all of your bills on time. There are sources that may advise you to lag behind on payments, later agreeing with collection agencies on repaying lower amounts just to settle your debts.

While this may benefit you in the short term, not paying your bills on time can significantly affect your business credit score. Not only will you be obligated to pay a late fee and possible interest on the outstanding balance, a payment that is over 30 days late will be reported to credit agencies, possibly lowering your business credit scores. One source states that “payment history information typically accounts for nearly 35 percent of your credit score, making it one of the single most important factors in calculating your score.“

Paying bills on time will boost your credit score; in fact, paying bills ahead of the due date will play an even bigger role in strengthening your score!

Raise Your Credit Limit

Your business credit score is calculated by factoring in your credit utilization ratio, which considers available credit in relation to debt. It is advisable to keep the ratio under 30% to have a high credit score.

Although you may not be able to limit the amount of debt your company has, you can improve the credit utilization ratio by increasing your credit limit. While many credit cards will do so automatically after a certain period of time, you can make proactive efforts by contacting lenders and requesting an increase in your credit limit to better your business credit score.

Increase your credit limit in order to raise your business credit score by securing a small business loan from IOU Financial! Contact us to inquire about a small business loan of up to $300,000 in just 24-48 hours!

Small Business Tips: Increasing Your Financial Literacy

Having a great idea and running with it is not enough to operate a successful business. A business owner must wear many hats when operating their company, but managing and understanding their finances doesn’t always come easily.

Relying on a business manager or an accountant is a beneficial way to verify that you are conducting your finances by the book, but many small business owners do not have the budgets to afford these specialists. In fact, “40 percent of small business owners say they are financially illiterate – yet 81 percent handle their business’ finances themselves,” according to an Intuit study as reported by one source.

Whether you will hire out or want to tackle your business finances yourself, it is necessary to have a basic understanding of your financial situation if you truly want to be in charge of your business. With a little effort, it is not difficult to increase your financial literacy with these tips:

Know What is Required to Run a Business

Bloomberg reported that 80 percent of businesses fail in the first 18 months, states a source. Much of that failure is due to the fact that business owners are not skilled in properly handling their finances. There is a lot of financial planning and management required to operate a company, such as “budget, accounting and taxes, calculating price points, and projecting revenues and success rates well into the future to ensure continued success.”

Some owners get into trouble because they don’t plan ahead, and don’t save for unexpected expenses, such as hiring additional staff,  surprise incidents that may arise, or the simple costs of doing business they may not have been aware of. Others don’t know payroll and tax rules, and receive heavy fines for paying late or not at all.

As a small business owner, it is imperative to understand all of the financial requirements to run a business!

If Borrowing Money, Do Your Research

It can be tempting to borrow money from a bank or an investor to start or grow your business, and this can help you get off the ground. Before you jump into the world of lenders,  take time to evaluate your own expenses and savings and calculate what you can afford, or if it would be possible to provide your own seed capital, a process called “bootstrapping.”

Although using your own funds can involve some risk, paying high interest rates can be harmful in the long run if your cashflow can’t afford it. If you do choose to borrow, make sure to compare the terms and interest rates that lenders and investors are offering, as well as research their credibility and history.

Learn Proper Financial Planning

Financial planning is essential to secure your company’s long-lasting success. Startups require substantial seed capital to cover expenses for the first few years. Few startups are profitable right away, as all the money is typically reinvested in business growth for hiring staff, marketing and inventory.

You must have a comprehensive understanding of your monthly expenses and profit. Small business owners who hire accountants typically cannot understand complicated accounting reports, so it would be advantageous to track expenses, profits and bank account balances themselves to stay on track, according to personal finance expert, Andrea Travillian. Truly understanding your monthly expenses will help you save for them rather than spend your profits as they come in, leaving you in a lurch when the time to pay bills comes around.

Save a portion of your monthly profits to pay for taxes; business owners who do not get in the habit of doing so can be pushed to declare bankruptcy when a significant amount is due from the IRS that they did not budget for.

If you need financial assistance to take a course to improve your financial literacy, hire a corporate accountant or pay business taxes, IOU Financial is ready to help! We provide small business loans of up to $300,000 in 24-48 hours!

What to Look for in a Financial Advisor

Considering that Americans have accumulated more debt now than ever before, working with a financial advisor can be a great decision in planning financial expenses. A financial advisor can help with putting together a budget to avoid overspending, choosing the right investment strategy or prepare for taxes that come with running a small family business.

There’s no reason to stay in the dark when it comes to money and getting the best results requires the right financial advisor. But how do you find the right financial advisor?

Do They Understand Your Needs?

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to finances. There are solid strategies that will benefit most people – for example, paying down debt is almost always a good choice. But every individual has their own financial goals and needs. A 45-year-old father of two will need very different financial advice than a 23-year-old single professional who just finished school.

Look for a financial advisor who demonstrates an understanding of your situation. That way, they can offer advice tailored to you.

Does Their Education, Expertise and Certifications Align with Your Own Goals?

Although financial advisors can cover a broad range of topics, if you’re looking for a specific type of financial advice, then you’ll want to look for an advisor whose qualifications match that area.

Maybe you’re trying to pay off student loan debt, getting your first mortgage or applying for a small business loan. These are all detail-heavy processes and you’ll get the best advice from a financial advisor who specializes in these processes. Evaluate the certifications a potential advisor has to see if they’re the right choice for your current and future goals.

Does Their Compensation Plan Incentivize Your Success?

You obviously pay for their service, but you might not be the only one paying a financial advisor.

There are many firms that offer their advisors product-based incentives; those advisors make a commission for selling the firm’s products to customers. Although this doesn’t necessarily make them bad financial advisors, it can create a conflict of interest and alter the advice they might suggest to you.

Don’t be afraid to ask a financial advisor about their compensation plan. Be careful with those that make money from sales; you’ll might end up wondering whether they’re recommending a product because it’s right for you or because it will make them money.

Can They Teach You?

Financial literacy is a gigantic problem for most Americans and very little is being done to solve the problem. What’s more troublesome is that the average person has more financial responsibilities than ever before. There are all kinds of ways borrow money including banks, credit unions and online lenders. It makes it easier than ever to accrue debt. Retirement no longer comes from pensions, Social Security may not be around in the future and people live longer than ever.

That makes it even more important to save money consistently and avoid debt. A financial advisor who can educate you on personal or business finances will help you save more and borrow less.

Do They Truly Seem to Care?

You don’t want your meetings with a financial advisor to feel like college lectures, but unfortunately, they often do. The advisor sees you as one of many clients, your money is just numbers added to a statement and they’ll simply go through the motions with you.

You might learn something from that type of advisor, but you’ll certainly have better results with an advisor who engages with you. Look for a financial advisor who inquiries about your current situation, your financial history, your goals and all the other important details about your life. When an advisor gets to know you as a human being, they can help you make the best financial decisions because they know your wants and needs in life.

There are plenty of excellent financial advisors out there and working with one could be the best decision you make to take control of your finances and improve your future. Be patient as you look for a financial advisor and keep those five questions in mind to ensure that the person you choose is the right fit and has your best interests at heart.

Guest Post: About the Author

Heather Lomax is a contributing writer from Financial Licensing Advisors. She regularly contributes articles to a variety of investment and finance blogs.

How to Build and Keep Your Business’ Good Credit Score

More than likely, you depended on your personal credit when you launched your small business. However, a growing business must tap higher amounts of capital, and a good business credit score will prove helpful in this regard.

Business Credit Score

Your business credit, also known as trade or commercial credit, is based on the likelihood that your enterprise will repay its debts. Like personal scores, your business credit score is calculated using several inputs, including your payment history, bankruptcies, collections and your credit utilization ratio – your outstanding credit balance divided by your available credit. In addition, your business credit score might include considerations about your company’s size and your industry. Keep in mind that your business credit report can be requested without your permission, and you’ll have to pay to get a copy of your business credit report.

Creating a Good Credit Score

It makes sense to establish your business credit score as soon as possible, because you don’t want to look desperate if you suddenly need credit. You’ll find many lenders require a company to operate for two years, although an IOU Financial loan needs only one year of history. If you’re operating, you should be building your business score. Here’s how to do it:

Obtain Federal Employer Identification Number:

This will help separate your business from your personal finances. You should also get a business checking account and a business phone number. For optimal protection of your personal assets, consider establishing your business as a limited liability company or a corporation.

Get a DUNS number:

Dun & Bradstreet is a corporate credit reporting agency that issues a universal identification number, the DUNS number, that is recognized around the globe. A DUNS number opens doors to some corporate and government contracts, as well as loans from the Small Business Administration. More to the point, D&B will create and track your business credit profile when you get a DUNS number, leading to an accurate credit score.

Establish credit accounts:

Obtain one or more business credit/debit/charge cards, including a gas card if your business has vehicles. Also, open credit accounts with your suppliers, including office supply stores.

Use your credit responsibly:

Pay your bills on time, and even ahead of schedule. Nothing helps your credit score like an unblemished repayment record. If money is tight, you can get a commercial loan and pay off your other debts. One of the biggest challenges a small business faces is making the monthly loan payment. IOU Financial has a better idea – daily or weekly automatic payments that you’ll barely notice.

Don’t be delinquent, renegotiate:

If you’re having trouble paying your credit accounts, don’t miss payments. Instead, reach out to your suppliers for looser terms. Many will agree rather than risk default.

Mind your credit utilization ratio:

A ratio below 20 percent is great. It means that you have the means to handle a sudden need for money without scrambling to obtain additional credit. It also indicates you are operating your business well. Make it a priority: Calculate your CRU and get it down below 20 percent.

Check your credit report:

Get an updated business credit report every three months and check for mistakes. One derogatory mistake can sink you credit score, so clean them up as soon as you identify them.

It’s wonderful to have a good credit score, but bear in mind that IOU Financial doesn’t require it to lend you money. If you’ve owned and operated your own business for at least a year, clear $100,000 in annual revenue, average a daily bank balance of at least $3,000, and make at least 10 bank deposits a month (for retail/e-tail companies), IOU Financial will do everything possible to approve your loan request, even if your credit score is less than good.