Tips to a Flawless eCommerce Checkout Process

For an online retail business, a good checkout process is crucial to its survival. There’s no other way for customers to buy the products in a timely, efficient manner than the website’s checkout platform. This is why so many small business owners in the online retail space spend a lot of time and money making sure this process is nearly flawless. In order to avoid the possibility of losing customers due to bugs and issues, you need to take some time to make sure your own checkout process works well.

This means doing more than just setting it up in the first place and letting it run. There are several steps you can take to make sure this checkout process is as perfect as possible without spending a lot of money on reprogramming the code itself unless necessary. Here are a few tips you can follow to make your own checkout process as optimized and perfect as possible.

Review the Intended Customer Experience

Everything about a business, whether it is physical or digital, should revolve around the desired customer experience. Your business survival hinges on a great experience each and every time your customer shops. Problems and challenges within this experience are likely to lose customers and harm your bottom line in the long run.

A digital checkout process is no different. Before it is created, a checkout process needs to be planned out in detail. Ideally, you should also take steps to optimize the efficiency of this process wherever possible. This can include reducing the required number of clicks, simplifying the interface and optimizing the amount of time the customer spends checking out in the first place.
While this step is easier to do before the checkout infrastructure has been created, you can go back to refine an existing checkout process as well. This may require some reprogramming depending on the customer experience your checkout process currently promotes, but it will be worthwhile in the long run.

Working from this point does have one big advantage, however. With an existing checkout process, you already have the experience of customers going through it. This means you can get feedback to see what is working and what is not. Try creating a little digital survey, prompting responses from email or social media, or directly connecting with customers you know first-hand to get this feedback. Use it to refine whatever issues or flaws your current customers experience when they go to check out.

Simplify Where Possible

A digital checkout platform can be technologically perfect and still have a poor user experience. Many web developers have a tendency to overcomplicate the checkout process, loading it up with more features than necessary and potentially losing loyal customers. When it comes to streamlining the checkout process and the user experience, you need to simplify it as much as possible.

One approach to take is to reduce the number of steps involved in the process in the first place. You may find you have too many links, buttons, form boxes or even pages than you need.The amount of simplification does not stop with just the number of steps. The interface of the checkout platform is also an area you should review. Is it easy to understand? Is the font readable? Is it clear where customers should click and where they should go?

Simplification can reduce potential confusion when done correctly. Here again, it’s helpful to get as much feedback as possible from current or future customers. If you’re creating your checkout process for the first time, try to do some beta testing with friends and family members to get their reaction and feedback.

Optimize the Engine

A checkout process is very similar to a car: It has many working internal components that can be optimized for better performance. In the case of the checkout platform, these components are the code and database. All software applications, from programs to websites, use code to define and create the specific features, looks and functionality of the platform. Sometimes, this code can be overly complicated and complex, which will reduce speed and increase processing times. When this happens, a qualified developer needs to go back into the code and revise it to make it more streamlined.

The database that stores product and customer information will also play a role in increasing the performance of the checkout process. A well-structured database on fast servers will decrease page loading times so customers do not have to wait as long for each step of the process. For both the code and the database, this is one area that is best left to the professionals. Unless you have actual programming experience yourself, a professional web developer will be more experienced to streamline the infrastructure as much as possible. They should also be able to do this more quickly than on your own.

Keep Refining the Process

The idea of a flawless checkout experience is appealing but can be difficult to reach if you stop refining it. In other words, true perfection is an ongoing process of revision and refinement. If you stop after you have initially made some changes, you are likely to ignore further problems and issues that develop down the road. You will also miss more opportunities to refine the checkout experience your customers will have each and every time.

A part of this is due to the changing nature of the checkout process itself. While the basics remain the same, there are always new techniques and technologies on the horizon that will streamline the process even further. You may also find different ways to approach common challenges found within an eCommerce checkout platform.

Always spend a little time with the performance data you have available. Keep track of the customer experience using trackers like Google Analytics and other marketing services so you can see where your customers may be experiencing problems. Do not hesitate to make changes if you start to notice certain trends. The best thing you can do is monitor and maintain the health of your checkout process.

Guest Post: About the Author

Jim Rulison serves as the CEO for Media Loop LLC (formerly the National Center for Pain Inc). Jim oversees the day to day operations for all lead generation accounts, with a concentration in the healthcare industry. Before joining Media Loop, Jim was the CEO of PME Home Health and was the founder of one of the nation’s first virtual call centers. He lives in the Rochester New York area where he and his late wife raised their two children. Jim spends his free time with his family and enjoying cooking and his two dogs.

Five Tips to Be a Happier, More Balanced Business Owner

If you run a small business, you probably have become accustomed to working hard….really hard. Seven-days-a-week hard, with nary a day off. Admirable, but also dangerous, because you risk burnout, health problems, and grumbling employees. It’s up to you to create a healthier work-life balance, so here are five tips to get you started:

Shorten your workweek:

Nowadays, many business owners feel guilty if they work less than 10 hours a day, including weekends. This is sure to exhaust your mind and hamper your creativity. If you want to increase your productivity, shorten your workweek. Put in no more than 40 per week and try to not work on weekends. Remember, sitting at your desk for long hours doesn’t equate to productivity. Work the hours you actually need to and relax the rest of the time.

Use technology:

We live in the high-tech era, so let technology do some of the heavy lifting for you. Automate your workday with a suite of apps that collect, process and distribute information. AI apps can automatically generate your Twitter tweets, schedule your appointments and alert you to important news. Update your old apps – email campaigns are much more sophisticated than they were five years ago, so use a modern app to manage your email marketing.

Enter the cloud:

Are your data and apps still residing on a hard disk on your computer? That’s a shame, because migrating to the cloud opens up all sorts of possibilities that can make you more productive and save you time. Look at apps like accounting, CRM, design and development. They need to share data to operate most efficiently. By putting your databases on the cloud, you can take advantage of scalable software that is constantly updated and doesn’t take up valuable real estate on your computer.

Take a vacation:

If you feel you are indispensable all the time, you’ll never get any time off. You deserve a vacation, and two weeks of sun and fun will do wonders for helping you get through the remaining 50. Pick your least busy time of year, and either close up shop or assign tasks to employees you can trust. Maybe two weeks is out of reach right now, but try to get at least three or four days in a block, and build from there.

Stop fretting about money:

Many small businesses have variable cash flows that sometimes leaves them cash-starved. This constant worry will drain all the joy out of being a business owner. The solution is to create a relationship with a trustworthy business lender, like IOU Financial. You can borrow and pay back quickly on convenient terms, with never a pre-payment penalty. Daily or weekly payments mean no large monthly lump-sum repayments to worry about. And with loans up to $300,000, we can give you peace of mind for just about any circumstance.

You started your own business to make money, be your own boss and do things the way you want. But wasn’t the ultimate goal to achieve a happy life? Don’t wait until it’s too late – add some joy to your life right now. Adopt our five tips, plus ones you come across in other articles. If you work with a team, what better way to demonstrate the value you place on work-life balance than to practice it yourself? Protect yourself from burnout now, and you’re more likely to happily remain in business over the long run.

Navigating Business Credit: What it is and How to Establish it

Small businesses play no small role in the U.S. economy. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), there are 29.6 million small businesses in the United States, which account for 99.9% of all the nation’s businesses.

Small businesses clearly make up the backbone of the US economy. However, many small business owners remain perplexed by the concept of business credit and how it works. More often than not, small business owners take on personal loans and use personal credit cards to fund their businesses, which can lead to financial and organizational headaches. This article aims to do three things:

  • Help small business owners understand the elusive concept of business credit
  • Highlight the factors that affect business credit scores
  • Assist them in building business credit

What Is Business Credit?

Business credit is a line of credit offered to a business that the business can use to pay unexpected expenses, or expected operating expenses when there is a lack of available cash.

Your business credit scoresare represented by numbers that signify whether your business is suitable for loaning money to or doing business with.

There are three primary credit bureaus (Experian, Dun & Bradstreet, and Equifax) that uniquely calculate business credit scores. Each has a different scoring algorithm. Experian and Dun & Bradstreet’s credit scores both range from 0 to 100, while the Equifax scoring scale ranges from 101 to 816.

Similarly to personal credit, those issuing credit to you will rely on your business credit scores in their decision making. The higher your business’ credit scores, the more likely you’ll be able to secure larger credit limits as well as more rewards and benefits.

What Factors Affect Business Credit Scores?

While your business credit scores vary depending on the specific credit bureau’s algorithm, a few general factors that underlie these scores are:

  • Number of trade experiences
  • Outstanding balances
  • Payment habits
  • Trends over time
  • Public record frequency and dollar amount
  • Delinquencies such as liens or bankruptcy
  • Credit utilization (the percentage of your total business credit that is being used)
  • Demographics such as years on file, Standard Industrial Classification codes and business size

5 Tips To Build Business Credit

Creating business credit is not something that happens automatically. It requires multiple steps on the part of the business owner. Building business credit will not only benefit the business’ credit scores, but open more credit card and loan options for the business. These funds allow the business to keep growing.

In the instance that you have never incorporated your business, or you are starting a small business from scratch, this quick guide will direct you down the path of building your business credit.

1. Incorporate Your Business

The first step on the road to building business credit is to separate yourself from your business through incorporation. Through incorporation, your business will become a distinct legal entity from your person. The U.S. Small Business Administration provides an in-depth guide to launching your business, including incorporation, which would be recommended for all budding entrepreneurs and small business owners.

2. Obtain an Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS

An EIN identifies your business for credit and tax purposes. It’s essential to get an EIN number for an SBA loan. In most cases, it is necessary to have one to open business bank accounts. An EIN allows business owners to separate their social security numbers from their businesses’ credit profiles.

3. Register with Dun & Bradstreet

When a business applies for business credit, lenders and suppliers commonly perform a credit check through Dun & Bradstreet. Register and set up a company profile under Dun & Bradstreet’s database in order to start establishing credit. Dun & Bradstreet will issue a nine-digit DUNS number that is universally used to identify businesses.

4. Open a Checking and Savings Account for Your Business

Open both a checking and savings account in your business’ name. This is done using your recently provided EIN and DUNS numbers. By doing this, you’ll separate your personal and business finances.

A business savings account is not mandatory, but is an intelligent move for any small business owner. A business savings account can assist when an unexpected cost arises and it can also be used as security for taking out a small business loan.

5. Obtain a Business Credit Card & Responsibly Manage Your Finances

Business credit cards are key to building business credit. It’s recommended that these credit cards should be commercial in nature and used for business expenses. Business owners should put any business credit accounts in the name of the business using their EIN and DUNS numbers.

It should be noted that not all business credit cards are created equal. Different business cards provide different types of rewards and benefits. Business owners should do their research and find business credit cards that aligns with the goals of their businesses.

While obvious, it is imperative to maintain excellent financial behavior to build business credit. Make sure to keep your credit card utilization low, pay all bills on time and in-full, and use a variety of credit.

Conclusion

Building strong business credit is not something that’s automatic or instantaneous. It requires business owners to be proactive and behave with financial responsibility. Time and excellent financial behavior are necessary ingredients in establishing high business credit scores for your small business. By understanding the core business credit concepts and following these tips, your business credit scores should be flourishing in no time.

Guest Post: About the Author

Courteney Reed is dedicated to empowering people to make smart financial decisions. As a financial industry analyst, she is driven to provide the most current and highest quality information available.

Seasonal Business? How to Prep for Your Slow Times

Seasonality is both a blessing and a curse for a small business. The blessing is that you have a great opportunity to capture the bulk of your annual revenues during the busy times. However, the prospect of one or more slack months in which revenue is punk but bills still have to be paid can truly seem like a curse. The saving grace is that seasonality is, by definition, predictable, which gives you a chance to prepare for the slow months. Here are some tips to shepherd your business through the lean times:

Understand your fixed and variable costs:

Naturally, you’ll need to cover your fixed costs, although it might be possible to postpone some of them. Variable costs seldom go to zero during slow seasons, but you do have the opportunity to slash them significantly. Adjust your monthly budget to reflect your reduced spending. If you find your cash won’t cover your expenses, contact IOU Financial for a quick business loan, often is as little as 48 hours. Our loans are easy to pay back without putting an undue strain on your cash flow. Because these loans are short-term, your total interest costs are tightly constrained.

Conserve your cash:

Build up your cash reserves during the busy season so that you can enter the slow months with a cushion. Once the slack season begins, execute your budget imperatives, including labor reductions and furloughs. A good strategy for seasonal businesses is to maintain only a minimal employee count and fill with hourly temps during the busy seasons. You can postpone inventory purchases until the end of the slow months and consider factoring your accounts receivable to speed up cash collections.

See the world:

Your vacation schedule will no doubt coincide with your slow season. This is especially feasible for mom-and-pop businesses. If you own an ice-cream store in Maine, then it makes sense to shutter the store during the winter and head off to warm climes. Your variable costs will be reduced to the greatest extent with this strategy.

Renegotiate with your suppliers:

Speak to your suppliers about your seasonal requirements and work out better credit terms during the slow period. For example, if your normal terms are 2/10 net 30, see about extending the payment due date to 60 or 90 days. If you’ve been a good customer, your suppliers will be more likely to accommodate your request. After all, suppliers want you to succeed, and it makes no sense for them to force you out of business and thereby lose a customer.

Adjust your marketing plans:

If you don’t have the ability to shut your business during the slow season, try bringing in more customers through sales events and promotions. You can program special events like raffles, classes, and bonus loyalty points for the slack periods.

Shore up your social media footprint:

If you have extra time during the slow period, put it to good use by increasing your social presence. Exploit your accounts on Facebook and Twitter to push out information about your special promotions. Start up or re-engage a newsletter and/or email campaign with useful and timely content that elicits readership.

IOU Financial provides affordable small business loans of up to $300,000, funded in as little as 48 hours. You won’t ever be charged upfront fees, and fixed daily or weekly repayments rids you of large, scary monthly payments. If seasonality is your business’ problem, then IOU Financial is your solution. Contact us today to learn more about how we can get you through the slow season in good shape.

Small Business Best Practices 2018

Best practices involve business owners finding and using ideas from outside their company to help improve performance and morale in the workforce. Operating a small business can be a challenging process at times, but small businesses can receive substantial benefits through professional development. Here is a list of the best practices that small business owners should focus on this year:

Have A Solid Foundation

Being successful starts at the core of the business. Owners should make sure that they have a solid team in place. Small business owners should look to hire people who share their passion and dedication to achieving success. Owners should hire employees based on the demand for their services. Small business owners should only consider hiring someone when the business is suffering from being short staffed.

Set Clear Expectations

Setting clear expectations for all employees and demanding accountability can make a huge impact. Small business owners should consider bringing all the managers and executives together monthly to discuss each department in the business. This is a good opportunity for small business owners to give and receive feedback.

Be Punctual

A common trait among successful business owners is that they are always on time. Staying on time will help small business owners develop better relationships with their partners and clients. Punctuality holds the business owner accountable and helps your day run a little bit smoother.

Small business owners should respond to any questions or concerns that a customer has in a timely manner. The faster that the business responds, the more impressed a customer will be.

Avoid only responding when a client initiates the dialogue. Try to answer questions in advance. Never let a client feel that the business doesn’t value their support.

Avoid Getting an Ego

Many small business owners can be stubborn at times. However, the most successful owners aren’t bothered by criticism or feedback. Business owners must be good listeners, willing to accept that things may not be going well and focus on the changes that need to be made.

Use Updated Technology

Running a business can be complex at times, as there are multiple variables that can impact outcomes. Small business owners should rely on data. Using data based decision making allows small business owners to take an objective viewpoint and keep track of important records. Protect yourself and your employees by installing cyber security systems.

Document Everything

When small business owners provide clear documentation for everything, that promotes transparency. Employees should have a clear idea of what is being asked of them. Documentation makes it easy for owners to bring on new employees while also stopping the business from being over reliant on a few employees.

Market Your Business

Your small business may not be a branding giant but there are small marketing steps to take to make your business more visible.

  • Stay active on social media accounts
  • Use paid advertising
  • Promote special events or sales
  • Make sure your contact information is updated and available

Marketing your business will increase revenue and your customers while also helping you connect to the community around you.

Always Think About the Future

Small business owners should incorporate policies that will be successful right now and in the coming years down the line. Owners should constantly look ahead so that they can continue evolving and avoid becoming outdated. Stay consistent and focus on the longevity of your business.

Emphasizing Customer Service

The most successful businesses have made proving excellent customer service a major point of emphasis. Dealing with unhappy customers is something that every business will have to deal with at some point. If the business handles the complaint with professionalism, that will enhance their reputation in the industry.

Save Money

Small business owners should try to put aside at least $1,000 to $1,500 a month. That way they can have a peace of mind concerning their finances and avoid fears of going out of business. Many business owners have said that getting their finances in order has helped their relationships with vendors.

Embody Your Mission Statement

Create a mission statement if you do not already have and let that be the heart of your business. Small business owners should enjoy the process of creativity. People and products are important, look to surround yourself with good people and strive to create innovative products.

Guest Post: About the Author

Brittany Waddell is a contributing writer and media specialist for NextGen Wealth. She often produces content for a variety of business blogs.

How to Prepare Your E-commerce Business for the Holidays

The holidays are upon us! While you may just be getting ready for Halloween, it’s vital to start thinking beyond that to prepare your e-commerce business for the winter holidays. In fact, most marketing experts believe that July is the right time to start planning, so if you haven’t yet, you’re already behind!

The holiday season can be an extremely profitable time for your business if you are smart about your strategy! Shoppers spent over $108 billion online during the holiday season last year, with online sales growing faster than traditional retail sales from year to year! To capitalize on that momentum, utilize the following strategies to get the most out seasonal promotional opportunities:

Create Holiday Strategies

Although we like to call the events starting from November to January, “the holidays,” it’s important to celebrate and plan for each one. The holiday season includes:

  • Thanksgiving
  • Black Friday
  • Cyber Monday
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day
  • New Year’s

Prepare a unique seasonal campaign for each holiday to offer your customers unique offers, products and designs to keep them coming back for more instead of making a single purchase.

Be Prepared

If all goes well, you will make record sales this holiday season. However, marketing your brand is only the first step to success. You must make sure that your business is prepared to deliver on the sales to keep up with customer demand.

Evaluate how much inventory you have in stock, and how quickly you can order more. It’s advantageous to reach out to your suppliers to inquire about their estimates for inventory during this time. They may very well sell out of popular items, leaving you in a lurch if you need to order something last minute and are not able to.

Many shoppers purchase last minute items, which is why you should consider offering different shipping options.  You may see an increase in sales if you allow your customers to get their deliveries in as little as 1 to 2 business days.  Research how much it would cost you to ship your items faster, and make sure to include those options on your sales page.

In preparation of increased orders around the holiday time, create your staff schedules early on, and make sure your employees commit to those schedules. People tend to take time off around the holidays, which is why you must make sure you have a sufficient number of workers ready to receive and prepare orders to go out.

Save

For any business to make money, it must first spend money. As such, you should save a considerable amount of money to both market and sell your products.

You will likely see an  increase in conversion rates during the holidays, but that also means that you will see more ad competition on social media. However, if you plan early, you can purchase ad inventory at lower prices than if you wait until the last minute.

If you simply cannot afford to compete with others for ads during this time, utilize other  resources to promote engagement. Start building an email list now so you have a completely free way to reach out to your customers to alert them about special deals and exclusive offers.

SEO

Online shoppers use seasonal keywords to shop for their products. Consider how your target shoppers would find your site, and optimize your content for those keywords.

They may include:

  • “Best Christmas gifts for teenagers”
  • “Funny holiday gifts”
  • “Employee holiday gifts”

Use Google Keyword Planner to search for keywords relevant to your niche, and try to choose the ones with the lowest competition and the highest monthly searches.

You can create Pay-Per-Click (PPC) campaigns and bid for shoppers to click on your link, or you can add those keywords to your blogs, video descriptions and social media posts to encourage engagement for little to no investment.

People love to spend money around the holiday time, and you should consider how you can encourage them to do it on your site! The strategies outlined in this article are the first steps you should take to prepare. If you need financial help in investing in your business during this time, contact IOU Financial. We work with small and medium-sized businesses to fund their goals with loans up to $300,000.

9 Mistakes You Could Be Making On Your Website That Can Ruin Your Business

Having a website for your brand is a wonderful thing, especially if you are focused on working globally. You can use it to interact with your users, sell your products and services, share content on your products, market your services, share reviews etc.

It became a norm in the business world. Benefits of having a website are highly talked about and praised in our modern society. Experts say that having a website can improve your business, create a good image of your brand and help you expand and engage with more people.

However, no one really talks much about how doing things wrong on your website can deteriorate your image and cost you your business. There are common mistakes that are often made not out of ignorance but coincidentally or because of forgetfulness.

Effects of these mistakes can be seen in sales, website visitation rates and bounce rates. This is why you need to be aware of them and have tools and knowledge to improve your website, eliminate the mistakes you are making and inevitably, improve your business.

Here are some common mistakes and some solutions to them:

There is no social proof

Imagine visiting a website where there are no reviews – good or bad – no newspaper articles or banners claiming that the website is legit. Would you stay on that website and make a purchase confidently?

Your answer is probably no. According to study, approximately 70% of people look at reviews, testimonials and other social proofs before making a decision to buy.

People need a social proof to be sure that they will not be tricked. This is basic psychology – you need to know that someone has walked that path and came out unharmed and happy if you are to walk that path yourself.

And this is what so many websites get wrong.

Avoid this by adding customer reviews, even if they are just good ones to your website. Include your stamps of approval from influencers, newspapers, other businesses from your niche, social media. Do whatever it takes to prove to a new visitor that you will not trick them.

You have a bad layout and design

People are visual creatures. They like looking at pretty things and if your layout and design don’t meet their expectations, you can be in trouble.

Bad layout, for one, can be confusing and hard to focus on. This is another easy fix – you only need to hire an expert to help you figure out what is the best layout for your business.

Design is another place where a lot of mistakes can happen. Wrong color scheme, font or illustrations can lead you to lose a lot of customers. Go for neutral colors that are easy on the eyes, pick readable fonts and make sure that everything is consistency with your brand. Check out the competition and see what they are doing. Don’t let your website look outdated.

There are no social media tags

If you are a business without social media profiles, you know you are doing something wrong.

Social media platforms are so good for businesses because they offer a unique way to build and maintain a relationship with your customers, according to study conducted by Moz. You can see their complaints and praises in the comments sections and use that to improve your business, you can get them to like you better by being fun and interesting on social media – the possibilities are endless.

If you do have social media profiles or pages, share them on your website. A customer can make an easier decision about a sale if they see that you are truly working with real people. Sometimes, this is all the social proof you need.

You have a confusing navigation

People don’t like visiting a website and being confused. Make it easy for them to find a page and move around your site. According to study conducted by Joshua Porter, users are more likely to make 3 clicks on the website to access the target page rather than 12 clicks. If some information is hard to find, they are likely to give up and move on. This is really bad for your business.

Hire someone to review your website as a new visitor and through the fresh eyes, you’ll be able to see if your website is easy to use or not.

You don’t provide enough information

On your website, you need to be open and share enough information about your business and yourself. Display your contact information or contact page prominently  – it should be your main goal for customers to be able to find you easily. Then proceed to tell your story and share just enough for them to be entertained and for you to seem legit.

Sharing too much can also be a problem.

Collin Nevin, an SEO-specialist at Boomessays, states, “You have to give your users enough information about your website and yourself for them to see you as a relevant and trustworthy business and person. Don’t make the information too hard to find and don’t make yourself unreachable. Share your addresses both email and physical, numbers and tell your story.”

You don’t post quality content

Take your time and write content that will truly resonate with your readers. You will not be able to achieve much with bad content. You can hire writers, writing services or write it yourself, but it needs to hold all of the relevant information.

Another mistake with content that you could be making is not checking it for plagiarism. Google doesn’t like plagiarized content, favoring more fresh information and new takes on different subjects. This is why you should definitely employ the services of a plagiarism checker like Copyscape or UKWritings.

You don’t optimize your images for speed

Visual content is always a good idea but not if it slows you down. People don’t like waiting and if your page takes too long to load, they will not stay.

Make sure that everything is in optimal condition and test your website while imitating similar pressure that it would endure with an enormous flood of visitors.

“Anything that might slow down your loading speed is your enemy. People don’t like waiting. This is why you need to optimize your images, icons and videos so that they don’t slow your loading speed down but improve it. This isn’t hard to do but it will mean a lot for your website and your business,” says Miranda Grayson, a Web Developer at Essayroo.

Your site is not mobile-friendly

Most of the readers like to consume their content and get information on their mobile devices. If your website is not mobile-friendly, they will not ‘pinch and zoom in’ for too long and they will move on quickly to find another, mobile-friendly website.

You make grammar and spelling mistakes

According to new studies and statistics, people don’t like grammar mistakes or misspelt words. It signals them that your website is not to be trusted and that it may be a scam, potentially harmful for their devices. This also represents you as someone who doesn’t care enough to eliminate these when they are so easy to fix by using tools like StateOfWriting or SimpleGrad.

Conclusion

While there are many benefits to having a website, there are also a lot of mistakes that you can make. Some of them are on this list and if you follow these tips on how to fix them, you’ll set yourself up for success.

Guest Post: About the Author

Grace Carter is a content manager at Paper Fellows and Academized, online writing services. She checks content quality, curates writers and explores marketing possibilities. Also, Grace is a tutor at Eliteassignmenthelp.com, academic website.

What You Should be Doing Now to Get Your Business Ready for the Holidays

Summer has come and gone and Fall is well underway. Its time to get your business ready for the holidays! If you think you can wait, think again – it takes time to plan and execute your holiday operations. Here are 7 tips for you to consider:

Optimize your website:

Whether you employ your website for sales or marketing purposes, you should prepare it for your holiday inventory and holiday services, including any seasonal increase in volume. Steps you should take include updating your security software, revamping your pages to reflect the holiday season, and creating special holiday landing pages. If necessary, clearly state holiday shipping deadlines and costs, as well as special store hours, if appropriate. Finally, do some load testing to ensure your website won’t crash due to heavy holiday traffic.

Order your inventory:

Do it now, before prices go any higher. Review previous year sale data to gauge how much to order and check out new products you will want to include this year. If necessary, arrange financing to pay for your inventory. Remember, IOU Financial can lend you up to $300,000 with funding in 24 to 48 hours. Having cash up front for your inventory purchases may get you preferential access to scarcer items, which can be a real leg up at holiday time.

Plan labor scheduling and temporary hiring:

Many retail stores require extra help during the holiday season. Make your preparations early to lock in the workers you will need, before your competitors grab them. Your holiday budget should reflect the costs of extra labor. Once again, you can turn to IOU Financial to fill any gaps in your working capital to ensure you can pay your extra employees promptly.

Spruce up your store:

The holiday season demands special décor and ambience. Think of pleasing all the senses with appropriate lighting, decorations, music, free samples of holiday food, and even employing a Santa for young children. Your promotions should tie in to the holidays, with frequent sales and surprises. Your website should parallel your retail store’s promotion plans, such as Gifts for Grandma, Gifts for Teacher, etc.

Increase your social media footprint:

Reach out to shoppers through online reviews and social media. Review your search results and ratings, and consider a holiday ad campaign on the major search engines. You can set up software to monitor new social mentions of your business during the holidays so that you can respond quickly to any negative reviews or comments.

Prepare and execute your holiday email campaigns:

Email marketing is an important adjunct to your sales funnel. During the holidays, your email’s will naturally take on a seasonal flavor. You also might consider a more aggressive distribution schedule to take advantage of the public’s buying mood before your competitors do. Vendors like MailChimp and Constant Contact let you plan out and execute your autoresponders and drip emails in a logical, effective fashion.

Plan your post-holiday buying rush:

Many retailers make a giant portion of their annual profits between Christmas and New Year’s Day. You’ll want to plan your special markdowns and how you will market them. Also, be prepared for the inevitable increase in returns – customers appreciate a streamlined process. Here’s a nifty idea: Sell your leftover gift cards at a discount during the post-holiday period.

The holidays can be your best friend or your worst enemy. Guarantee the former by planning your holiday moves early on and funding your working capital with a handy small business loan from IOU Financial to ensure you have enough cash for all the extra costs during the holiday season.

Manage Costs And More With Business Credit Cards

If you run a business, chances are high that you might have considered business credit card for purchases. When compared to personal credit card, business owners can always expect the finest response from these forms of business related credit cards. Whether you are just a single operator or part of a larger conglomerate, a business card is what you need to have. Unfortunately, these cards are the most overlooked aspects of any business finance and that of the business management. First, it is high time to learn more about these cards and how those options are subject to work for you.

Why a Business Credit Card?

Business cards are primarily used for any form of business-related expense. You can expense various purchases for the tax section and these are mostly purchased on business credit card. It is rather a common place to use business cards for practically any form of purchase with dual purpose. It means you can use the business cards for not just basic work but also for buying fuel for your car if you want to!

Establishing Business Credit:

When you first set foot in the business world, your business will not have any established credit. That’s where the credit card will help. Be sure to research and select a card that will help grow your business and your business credit history.  Consider a card with reasonable interest rate and annual fees to keep balances as close to zero as you can. This is the first step to move towards success.

Manage Your Spending: 

A major reason for business owners to pursue business card is to help manage expenses. Keeping track of all the purchases under one platform is a streamlined approach when compared to multiple forms of payment methods. By having all your purchases in one place, it can be much easier to keep an eye on things. If you check the balance on your business card once every week or so, spending can easily be reined in early stages.

Rack Up Rewards:

Another important reason to get a business credit card is to take advantage of perks to help move the business forward. Some card benefits include  flat rate rewards, sign up bonuses, cash back, and travel perks. Use your purchases to your advantage by earning rewards. If you are a frequent traveler, find a credit card that helps you earn flights. If you are trying to buy physical products find a card that earns you cash back.

Rewards:

  • Cash back rewards
  • Spending some limits for employees
  • Sign up bonuses with great return values
  • Interest free periods and balance transfers
  • Airport lounge access
  • Travel rewards
  • No such spending limits
  • Building credits for businesses, and much more

It is vital that you get in line with the best financial institution, ready to help you with the business based credit cards. They know your requirements and will help you out accordingly.

Guest Post: About the Author

Marina Thomas is a marketing and communication expert. She also serves as content developer with many years of experience. She helps clients in long term wealth plans. She has previously covered an extensive range of topics in her posts, including business debt consolidation and start-ups.